collababortion:

shimmerandfadeaway:

nodamncatnodamncradle:

burningbrooklynbridges:

grown. ass. men.

you scared she gonna strike out yr precious baby boy? OH TOO LATE.

they were doing a special on her on one of the news channels at the gym. i didnt have the headphones so i couldnt hear the story, but one of the photos they showed was of a little girl in the crowd holding up a sign that said “I want to throw like a girl.” For every pathetic, insecure grown man who is threatened by this amazingly talented girl, hopefully there is another little girl who is inspired. But that she has to put up wit this kind of abuse even though she is OBJECTIVELY the best pitcher in the league right now and can throw a ball SEVENTY MILES PER HOUR is absolutely uncalled for. She is truly phenomenal, and those dads can all go eat shit and live

Go on with your bad self

I love that, in a brief interview I got to see, she stated that her main goal was to have more girls play ball so that “we could maybe get our own locker room.” Like, that’s all she wanted, and then she went back to talking about how winning is a TEAM effort and that the reporter should interview the rest of the team, too.
I LOVE THIS ONE.

Successful people are often motivated by the joy of making shitty people shut the fuck up.

(via wilwheaton)

cross-connect:

The Magical Surreal Worlds of Jacek Yerka
Born in Poland in 1952, JACEK YERKA studied fine art and graphics prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1980.  While at university, Yerka resisted the constant pressures of his instructors to adopt the less detailed, less realistic techniques that characterize so much of contemporary art.  Instead, he stubbornly continued to work in the classic, meticulous Flemish style he still favors to this day. In the end, it was his teachers who eventually relented, finally recognizing their determined student as a brilliant (although troubling) talent.

                                                    & cross-connect:

The Magical Surreal Worlds of Jacek Yerka
Born in Poland in 1952, JACEK YERKA studied fine art and graphics prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1980.  While at university, Yerka resisted the constant pressures of his instructors to adopt the less detailed, less realistic techniques that characterize so much of contemporary art.  Instead, he stubbornly continued to work in the classic, meticulous Flemish style he still favors to this day. In the end, it was his teachers who eventually relented, finally recognizing their determined student as a brilliant (although troubling) talent.

                                                    & cross-connect:

The Magical Surreal Worlds of Jacek Yerka
Born in Poland in 1952, JACEK YERKA studied fine art and graphics prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1980.  While at university, Yerka resisted the constant pressures of his instructors to adopt the less detailed, less realistic techniques that characterize so much of contemporary art.  Instead, he stubbornly continued to work in the classic, meticulous Flemish style he still favors to this day. In the end, it was his teachers who eventually relented, finally recognizing their determined student as a brilliant (although troubling) talent.

                                                    & cross-connect:

The Magical Surreal Worlds of Jacek Yerka
Born in Poland in 1952, JACEK YERKA studied fine art and graphics prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1980.  While at university, Yerka resisted the constant pressures of his instructors to adopt the less detailed, less realistic techniques that characterize so much of contemporary art.  Instead, he stubbornly continued to work in the classic, meticulous Flemish style he still favors to this day. In the end, it was his teachers who eventually relented, finally recognizing their determined student as a brilliant (although troubling) talent.

                                                    & cross-connect:

The Magical Surreal Worlds of Jacek Yerka
Born in Poland in 1952, JACEK YERKA studied fine art and graphics prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1980.  While at university, Yerka resisted the constant pressures of his instructors to adopt the less detailed, less realistic techniques that characterize so much of contemporary art.  Instead, he stubbornly continued to work in the classic, meticulous Flemish style he still favors to this day. In the end, it was his teachers who eventually relented, finally recognizing their determined student as a brilliant (although troubling) talent.

                                                    & cross-connect:

The Magical Surreal Worlds of Jacek Yerka
Born in Poland in 1952, JACEK YERKA studied fine art and graphics prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1980.  While at university, Yerka resisted the constant pressures of his instructors to adopt the less detailed, less realistic techniques that characterize so much of contemporary art.  Instead, he stubbornly continued to work in the classic, meticulous Flemish style he still favors to this day. In the end, it was his teachers who eventually relented, finally recognizing their determined student as a brilliant (although troubling) talent.

                                                    & cross-connect:

The Magical Surreal Worlds of Jacek Yerka
Born in Poland in 1952, JACEK YERKA studied fine art and graphics prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1980.  While at university, Yerka resisted the constant pressures of his instructors to adopt the less detailed, less realistic techniques that characterize so much of contemporary art.  Instead, he stubbornly continued to work in the classic, meticulous Flemish style he still favors to this day. In the end, it was his teachers who eventually relented, finally recognizing their determined student as a brilliant (although troubling) talent.

                                                    & cross-connect:

The Magical Surreal Worlds of Jacek Yerka
Born in Poland in 1952, JACEK YERKA studied fine art and graphics prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1980.  While at university, Yerka resisted the constant pressures of his instructors to adopt the less detailed, less realistic techniques that characterize so much of contemporary art.  Instead, he stubbornly continued to work in the classic, meticulous Flemish style he still favors to this day. In the end, it was his teachers who eventually relented, finally recognizing their determined student as a brilliant (although troubling) talent.

                                                    & cross-connect:

The Magical Surreal Worlds of Jacek Yerka
Born in Poland in 1952, JACEK YERKA studied fine art and graphics prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1980.  While at university, Yerka resisted the constant pressures of his instructors to adopt the less detailed, less realistic techniques that characterize so much of contemporary art.  Instead, he stubbornly continued to work in the classic, meticulous Flemish style he still favors to this day. In the end, it was his teachers who eventually relented, finally recognizing their determined student as a brilliant (although troubling) talent.

                                                    & cross-connect:

The Magical Surreal Worlds of Jacek Yerka
Born in Poland in 1952, JACEK YERKA studied fine art and graphics prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1980.  While at university, Yerka resisted the constant pressures of his instructors to adopt the less detailed, less realistic techniques that characterize so much of contemporary art.  Instead, he stubbornly continued to work in the classic, meticulous Flemish style he still favors to this day. In the end, it was his teachers who eventually relented, finally recognizing their determined student as a brilliant (although troubling) talent.

                                                    &

cross-connect:

The Magical Surreal Worlds of Jacek Yerka

Born in Poland in 1952, JACEK YERKA studied fine art and graphics prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1980.

While at university, Yerka resisted the constant pressures of his instructors to adopt the less detailed, less realistic techniques that characterize so much of contemporary art.

Instead, he stubbornly continued to work in the classic, meticulous Flemish style he still favors to this day.

In the end, it was his teachers who eventually relented, finally recognizing their determined student as a brilliant (although troubling) talent.

                                                    &

koercion:


A Washington Post reporter.
In America.
koercion:


A Washington Post reporter.
In America.
koercion:


A Washington Post reporter.
In America.
koercion:


A Washington Post reporter.
In America.
koercion:


A Washington Post reporter.
In America.
koercion:


A Washington Post reporter.
In America.
koercion:


A Washington Post reporter.
In America.
koercion:


A Washington Post reporter.
In America.
koercion:


A Washington Post reporter.
In America.

koercion:

A Washington Post reporter.

In America.

(via afternoonsnoozebutton)

wilwheaton:

liartownusa:

US Weekly No.1: Time to Look at More Assholes

Proper source on the image I posted earlier. Thanks to @larrymac808 for the info!

wearethetay:

jedavu:

Charming Illustrated Cinemagraphs Reflect The Idyllic Mood Of Lazy Summer Days
by Rebecca Mock 

You can feel each one…
wearethetay:

jedavu:

Charming Illustrated Cinemagraphs Reflect The Idyllic Mood Of Lazy Summer Days
by Rebecca Mock 

You can feel each one…
wearethetay:

jedavu:

Charming Illustrated Cinemagraphs Reflect The Idyllic Mood Of Lazy Summer Days
by Rebecca Mock 

You can feel each one…
wearethetay:

jedavu:

Charming Illustrated Cinemagraphs Reflect The Idyllic Mood Of Lazy Summer Days
by Rebecca Mock 

You can feel each one…
wearethetay:

jedavu:

Charming Illustrated Cinemagraphs Reflect The Idyllic Mood Of Lazy Summer Days
by Rebecca Mock 

You can feel each one…
wearethetay:

jedavu:

Charming Illustrated Cinemagraphs Reflect The Idyllic Mood Of Lazy Summer Days
by Rebecca Mock 

You can feel each one…
wearethetay:

jedavu:

Charming Illustrated Cinemagraphs Reflect The Idyllic Mood Of Lazy Summer Days
by Rebecca Mock 

You can feel each one…

wearethetay:

jedavu:

Charming Illustrated Cinemagraphs Reflect The Idyllic Mood Of Lazy Summer Days

by Rebecca Mock 

You can feel each one…

(via wilwheaton)

"A hotel lounge full of giant lizards? Can we go there? Is that still a thing?" "A hotel lounge full of giant lizards? Can we go there? Is that still a thing?"

"A hotel lounge full of giant lizards? Can we go there? Is that still a thing?"

(via goodstuffhappenedtoday)

cartoonpolitics:

"I’ll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one." .. (Robert Reich)

cartoonpolitics:

"I’ll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one." .. (Robert Reich)

bunnyfood:

(via sharkdoom:lawebloca:via)

GIRL he did not say that to you, you know you gotta dump that.

(via fuckyeahinterspeciesfriendships)

plaidandredlipstick:

the reason male comic book fans work themselves into a frenzied rage over “fake geek girls" is because they think they can’t get a girlfriend because of their love for comic books (a.k.a nerdiness). if they accept that geek girls genuinely love comic books, then they’re left with the cold harsh reality that it’s not their nerdiness that makes them unattractive to women, but the fact that they are misogynistic condescending dickbags who need to be avoided AT ALL COSTS

Fact.

(via afternoonsnoozebutton)

The Mona Lisa is always held up as the high watermark of great art. In the Louvre, you can’t get near it for all the tourists mobbing it with their cameras. The truth: it’s da Vinci’s most average work, it lacks anything extraordinary, and there’s nothing timeless about it, other than being a piece by a very skilled artist who did many OTHER amazing timings. It’s the most unremarkable painting ever coveted by so many. If the Louvre were on fire, there are hundreds of pieces that should be saved first (ridiculously false monetary value aside).

(via afternoonsnoozebutton)

ieatemokids:

The sad part is not only is this completely true, but domestic violence still rose by 26% even when the team won.


Sports! ieatemokids:

The sad part is not only is this completely true, but domestic violence still rose by 26% even when the team won.


Sports! ieatemokids:

The sad part is not only is this completely true, but domestic violence still rose by 26% even when the team won.


Sports! ieatemokids:

The sad part is not only is this completely true, but domestic violence still rose by 26% even when the team won.


Sports!